Exploring the Motivation for Change and Its Impact on Wellbeing 

Change is an inevitable part of life, and our ability to adapt and grow through change is crucial for personal development and wellbeing. Motivation for change is a complex concept that involves an internal or external drive prompting action towards a new goal or direction. It's the fuel that powers the journey of transformation and personal growth. 
 
Understanding Motivation for Change 
Motivation for change arises from the recognition of a discrepancy between one's current state and desired state. It's the realisation that something could be better, healthier, or more fulfilling. This realisation can come from within, as a personal desire for improvement, or from external factors, such as societal pressures or life events. 
 
The Benefits of Change for Wellbeing 
Embracing change can lead to numerous benefits for our wellbeing. It can foster personal growth, increase flexibility, and improve life values. Change often brings about new opportunities and the chance to develop resilience and strength. Moreover, it can lead to progress in various aspects of life, such as career, relationships, and personal achievements. 
 
Achieving Change for Wellbeing 
Achieving change requires a clear understanding of what you want to change and why. It involves setting realistic goals, creating a plan, and taking actionable steps towards those goals. Support from friends, family, or professionals can also be instrumental in navigating the path of change. 
Change is a constant in both personal and professional realms, and understanding the motivation behind change can be pivotal for successful transformation. Various models have been developed to explain the processes and motivations that drive change. Among these, three stand 

Exploring the Landscape of Change: Motivational Theories 

Change is a constant in both personal and professional realms, and understanding the motivation behind change can be pivotal for successful transformation. Various models have been developed to explain the processes and motivations that drive change. Among these, three stand out for their comprehensive approach and widespread application: the Health Belief Model by Becker MH, the Self-Determination Theory by Deci & Ryan, and the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change. 
 
The Health Belief Model (HBM), developed by social psychologist Marshall H. Becker, is one of the earliest and most widely used theories that explain how individuals make decisions regarding their health. The HBM suggests that a person's belief in the severity of a health threat, combined with their belief in the efficacy of the recommended health action, strongly influences their readiness to take action. This model has been instrumental in designing public health interventions and understanding patient compliance. 
 
Self-Determination Theory (SDT), formulated by psychologists Edward L. Deci and Richard M. Ryan, offers a broader framework for studying human motivation. At its core, SDT posits that human beings have an inherent tendency towards growth and development and that this natural propensity is supported by fulfilling basic psychological needs: competence, autonomy, and relatedness. SDT has been applied in various fields, including education, work, and psychotherapy, to foster environments that enhance motivation and wellbeing. 
 
The Transtheoretical Model (TTM), developed by James O. Prochaska and Carlo DiClemente, breaks down the process of intentional behaviour change into stages. These stages include precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance, with the understanding that individuals may move back and forth between these stages before achieving lasting change. The TTM is particularly useful in designing stage-matched interventions and has been applied to a wide range of behaviours, from smoking cessation to exercise adoption. 
Each of these models brings a unique perspective to understanding motivation for change. The HBM focuses on individual beliefs and perceptions, SDT emphasises basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation, and the TTM outlines a sequential process of change. Together, they provide a rich tapestry of theoretical frameworks that can guide individuals and professionals in fostering positive change. 
Whether it's adopting healthier habits, pursuing personal growth, or implementing organisational change, these models offer valuable insights into the complex nature of motivation and behaviour change. By leveraging the strengths of each model, one can develop a more nuanced approach to facilitating change in various contexts. 

Reminder to reserve your place for the 31st July's Mental Health First Aider Facilitated Forum if you haven't yet.  

Quarterly MHFaider Facilitated Forum. 
Support for MHFAiders: providing guidance and reassurance they are not alone. 
Our MHFAider guidance & support forums are tailored to provide MHFAiders with the clarity they need to excel in their role. We believe it's important to offer a safe space for MHFAiders to discuss their role, while staying up-to-date with the latest best practices and information. 
 
Outline of Session 
Part one: Reflecting on the previous quarter as a MHFAider 
In this section, group discussions will focus on assessing how the previous quarter has been as a MHFAider. Participants are encouraged to come prepared with questions about the role or a recent experience they have had, which could serve as a "case study" for guidance and reassurance. 
 
Part two: Focused topic discussion 
Explore a particular topic in greater depth. Our experienced instructor team or a qualified guest speaker will guide the discussion, facilitate practical tasks, or share relevant videos. This is also an opportunity for continued learning, improving knoweldge and resource sharing. 

Ready, willing and able? 

My thoughts around motivation to change always brings me back to this fundamental question. Am I ready, willing and able to make the change? Sometimes it can be difficult to find that space where these attributes coexist, and it can be even harder to maintain that space for a long period of time. This is what makes change so challenging, especially when there is a perceived reward that comes with maintenance of the behaviour we are seeking to change. As I work towards my own change goals, I break down these three attributes and consider each in turn, exploring ways I can improve my motivation through thought recording, challenging and reflection on what I can do to take one step forward. 
Ready? 
Getting into the mindset that you want to make the change and preparing the resources needed to begin this journey can be the most daunting step. Approaches to overcome this hurdle can include identifying the pros and cons of change, setting SMART goals and rewards for progress. Asking the “miracle question”, what do I want to be different and what would my life look like if I made the change? The cycle of change can also help as a reference point of where you are in this journey and what the next step is. Remember, we go around the cycle on average, 7 times before change sticks, so persevere. 
Willing? 
Procrastination is where I live. If there is something else that needs to be done, I’ll do it. I will go to great lengths in avoiding the steps required to move forward through distracting myself with other activities. It can be helpful to set a timeframe as part of SMART goal setting, which recognises the steps that need to be taken and helps to keep us on course. I tend to need that deadline looming over me to motivate and focus me on the task in hand, so being firm in your timeframe may be essential. 
Able? 
Procrastination is where I live. If there is something else that needs to be done, I’ll do it. I will go to great lengths in avoiding the steps required to move forward through distracting myself with other activities. It can be helpful to set a timeframe as part of SMART goal setting, which recognises the steps that need to be taken and helps to keep us on course. I tend to need that deadline looming over me to motivate and focus me on the task in hand, so being firm in your timeframe may be essential. 
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